Women In The Workplace

Women-men-differs

Here at Bel Air Jewelry we believe in equality. We just a read a great article about six things for women never to write in an email at work. We’ve added a few to it and wanted to share it with you. It’s a tough balance being a woman in the workplace and commanding the respect deserved of your position. Too often, due to the psychology of the culture, we belittle ourselves or make ourselves smaller in order to get things done when in reality a woman can hold a position of power just like a man can. Use these few tips to safeguard against that old toxic ideology, and shine on!

1. “I’m sorry . . .”
I’m not sorry anymore! We have to stop apologizing for asking people to do things, particularly when it’s something that’s part of their job.

2. “Just . . .”
We need to stop using this word as a way to weaken a request or our opinion.

3. “This might be a stupid question but . . .”
Like they said in school, there are no stupid questions. Well, sometimes there are—but ask, don’t caveat.

4. “If you want my two cents . . . ”
A man usually gives his three cents, and he certainly doesn’t offset his thoughts with this phrase.

5. “I may be wrong but . . .”
Don’t lessen the impact of what you say before you say it.

6. “Does this make sense?”
I do this one a lot, and I can’t stand it. Trust that what you wrote makes sense. Don’t openly question in email whether or not your thinking is sensical.

7. “:)”
Although we live in a culture of emoticons, lets keep it out of the workplace.

8. “I hope you’re doing well. How are you?”
It’s great to have friends at work, but make sure that you’re not being everyone’s “friend.” There are times when you can cleanly give orders and direction without having an emotional connection.

9. “Do you have time to….?”
Most men don’t preface if an employee or coworker has time. There are clear job responsibilities, don’t feel like you can’t state those demands directly. And if you need something, just ask. No sense beating around the bush.

10. “I’m not sure.”
Although it’s fine to admit your failings, if an employee asks you something, find out before you answer them. Also don’t tag on the end of requests this little self cutting sentence. Stay strong

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